Merino Wool

Ekotree's Superfine Merino Knitwear Is Made In Doolin All Ekotree's superfine merino knitwear is made in Doolin, Ireland Ekotree Irish knitwear mainly uses the superfine merino grade of wool (15–18.5 µm) or 15-18.5 microns for our finer knits which include wraps, hats and scarves and any knitwear that may be used next to the skin. We also use the medium grade (19.6–22.9 µm) for Ekotree Aran knitwear. This is the chunkier knitwear that has more of a traditional Aran feel and look and similar to traditional Irish knitwear but made in a modern context using contemporary colour palettes and silhouettes. Both grades are create very fine knitwear product especially when wet finished giving excellent drape and softness. The Merino is an economically influential breed of sheep prized for the fineness of its wool. This wool can be generally graded into 5 main categories: Broad wool (23–24.5 µm), medium wool (19.6–22.9 µm), fine (18.6–19.5 µm), superfine (15–18.5 µm) and ultra fine (11.5–15 µm). Merino are highly prized and the world demand for finer merino wools is continually growing. In 2008 an Australian Merino ewe was sold for A$ 14,000 at the Sheep Show and auction held in New South Wales. [

Ekotree only sources its alpaca from reputable sources. PACOMARCA: “Sustainable Alpaca Network” is an international enterprise providing support for the sustainable development of alpaca raising. It seeks to generate benefits for all those involved in the alpaca production chain, and especially for the thousands of rural families who make a living from this resource in the harsh conditions of the Peruvian highlands. The idea came about from the need to promote the human development of alpaca producers through their links with the modern world of textiles and to respond to the important changes occurring in social and economic areas as well as in climate. A little history about alpaca Alpacas have been bred in South America for thousands of years. The wild South American camelid Vicuñas were first domesticated and bred into alpacas by the ancient tribes of the Andean highlands of Peru, Argentina, Chile and Bolivia. Two-thousand-year-old Paracas textiles are thought to include alpaca fibre. Today Alpacas are kept in herds that graze on the level heights of the Andes of southern Peru, northern Bolivia, Ecuador, and northern Chile at an altitude of 3,500 m (11,500 ft) to 5,000 m (16,000 ft) above sea level, throughout the year. Alpacas are considerably smaller than llamas, and unlike llamas, they were not bred to be beasts of burden, but were bred specifically for their fibre. Fleece Alpaca fleece is the natural fibre harvested from an alpaca. It is light or heavy in weight, depending on how it is spun. It is a soft, durable, luxurious and silky natural fibre. While similar in structure to sheep’s wool, it is warmer, not prickly, and has no lanolin, which makes it hypoallergenic. Its softness comes from having a different smoother scale surface than sheep wool. Alpaca is naturally water-repellent and difficult to ignite.

Knitted Cashmere

Knitted Cashmere

Ekotree produces a range of luxury cashmere products knitted on fine gauge looms.

Ekotree Merino Wool

Ekotree Merino Wool

All Ekotree's superfine merino knitwear is made in Doolin, Ireland Ekotree Irish knitwear mainly uses the superfine merino grade of wool (15–18.5 µm) or 15-18.5 microns for our finer knits...

Eco Alpaca Yarns

Eco Alpaca Yarns

Alpacas are considered some of the “greenest” animals around. Their adaptations for living in harsh environments like the Andes give them a light eco-footprint: soft pads in place of hooves...